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Talk on Corners
Christopher Wheelahan

Chris first caught the F1 flu back in 2003 but lost track due to the snooze-fest that was the 2004 season. In 2010 Chris rediscovered the sport and has become enthralled since. He makes no claims to be a superb writer or journalist but only an obsessive follower of motorsport, particularly F1. Nowadays Chris spends his spare time experimenting with cocktails and wasting time with Musical Theatre types. He does not enjoy long walks on the beach… sorry.

Tied up with a messy bow // A potential who's who of the remaining available 2013 seats

Published

With the silly season winding to a close, it is finally becoming a little bit easier to predict who may or may not be driving on Sundays next year. Let's review who has been confirmed, and then look ahead to which drivers might be up for the remaining seats.

2013 Driver Lineup
TeamDriverDriver
Red BullSebastian VettelMark Webber
FerrariFernando AlonsoFelipe Massa
McLarenJenson ButtonSergio Pérez
LotusKimi RäikkönenTBC
MercedesLewis HamiltonNico Rosberg
SauberNico HülkenbergTBC
Force IndiaPaul di RestaTBC
WilliamsTBCTBC
Toro RossoJean-Éric VergneDaniel Ricciardo
MarussiaTimo GlockTBC
CaterhamTBCTBC
HRTPedro de la RosaTBC

Lotus

They’ve confirmed the Iceman for 2013 and he repaid them for it with victory in Abu Dhabi. Further, third in the championship is pretty doggone respectable in a first year back from a break, although Kimi has said he’d rather be in fourth so he doesn’t have to attend the award ceremony. There was also probably some profanity in there too, but I don’t have the exact quote. So who will be driving with the Finn?

Romain Grosjean has a better shot than anybody else. That much is obvious. The question here is whether Éric Boullier is comfortable wrecking another 7 cars next season in exchange for Grosjean’s fairly respectable performances in the other 12 races? Other options on the table include Edoardo Mortara from the DTM series who was testing for the team this week and did a good job, a newly ‘retired’ Michael Schumacher or their current reserve driver: Jérôme D’Ambrosio.

A little something in reserve
A little something in reserveCredit: Andrew Ferraro/LAT

Jérôme has the best shot of the remaining three, having already driven for the team this week and with some decent experience under his belt. Mortara is just as young as Grosjean and can’t legitimately promise anything that Romain can’t. Schumacher is an odd duck in this race. He says he’s retiring, and that he’s done with Grand Prix racing for good, but I can’t help but think he would do another season for a shot with the historic (and promising) Lotus team. Besides, how many times did Brett Favre retire? It’s not unprecedented; though maybe the old Rain-meister is done for good.

If I were running the team, I would wait as long as possible to make that decision so I could see who is on the market by the end of the year. Lotus will take the best driver (not the richest, like some of their rivals may) available at the time they make their decision. If it happens to be Romain, then so be it. I predict that this will be a fairly late announcement from the team; possibly after Brazil.

Sauber

With Sergio Pérez making the move to McLaren, it had opened up one spot at Sauber. Little did we know that both spots were available. The Hulk has been confirmed for next year in Checo’s spot (this is still a mystery to me) but still no word on Kobayashi’s race drive. Given his outstanding performance at Suzuka, I rather expected that he would be confirmed shortly thereafter but apparently Monisha Kaltenborn is not quite as convinced.

Esteban Gutiérrez has been making strides with the team and getting more seat time (what with Sergio’s mystery illness) indicating that the team is leaning towards giving him the Sunday drive. One of the team’s senior engineers Giampaolo Dall’Ara stated,

Obviously we know Esteban a lot better than we knew Robin [Frijns] before yesterday, and he is also quite familiar with the team and the track. This helps for some procedures and communication.

- Giampaolo Dall’Ara

I couldn’t agree more. Esteban has experience with the team and sponsorship to back him up. The drivers with a legitimate shot at the Sauber drive next year are really just Kamui Kobayashi and Esteban Gutiérrez. It’s really a question as to whether they are looking for youth and enthusiasm (and money) or experience in the cockpit. Outside possibilities would include Robin Frijins (but I don’t see what he can bring that Gutiérrez can’t) and Jaime Alguersuari (but I don’t see what he can bring that Kobayashi can’t).

Williams

Currently, neither Williams driver is contracted for a 2013 drive. The rumor mill has been rather quiet about Maldonado’s status with the team, which indicates to me that he’s just bringing in too much money for Toto Wolff to let him go. Also, he is a blindingly quick driver when he’s not shredding carbon fiber against another car. Frankly, I think Pastor Maldonado is safe for a 2013 drive.

The incredible flying Bottas
The incredible flying BottasCredit: Glenn Dunbar/LAT

Bruno Senna on the other hand has had a number of rumors milling about involving him. Quite the opposite of Pastor, this tells me that he may be shifting about next year. What with Valtteri Bottas driving rather quickly on Fridays and Bruno not really impressing the sponsors, the team may choose to go with the young Finn for next year. He’s done very well in GP3 and has enormous potential as a driver. He’s not finished below third in any championship he has competed in! That’s simply incredible. Perhaps we will have a new flying Finn to watch next year.

The team doesn’t need to make this decision soon. Senna is already sniffing out other offers but if he ends up taking one, they have Valtteri to fall back on for the race seat. I don’t think the team is overly enamored of the young Brazilian, despite the sponsorship he is bringing in. He’s a solid mid-pack driver, and that’s not what teams are looking for.

Force India

What with Nico gone, there’s a seat open at the team for someone with experience or cash or both. Just about everybody and their brother has been tied to the Force India seat. Jaime Alguersuari, Kamui Kobayashi, Jules Bianchi, Adrian Sutil, Charles Pic all would love to drive for the team. All the team needs to do is get their ducks in a row and choose a driver. It’s not easy when you have a ton of people knocking down your door.

As I’ve already said in a previous article, Jaime Alguersuari could be a valuable asset to any team he drives for. He’s got knowledge of next year’s tires, experience and a decent chunk of cash... and those eyes. Were I the team principal at Force India, this would be an easy decision for me, but there are certainly other options; options such as Jules Bianchi.

Jules has done well testing for both Force India and Ferrari this year. He, of course, will want to take the prancing stallion out on Sundays but Ferrari has really shown no tangible commitment to him as a driver. They re-signed Felipe Massa, and rumors seem to always be bouncing around about Mark Webber for 2014, so if I were Jules, I’d be anxious to prove myself on-track as soon as possible. He’s also a logical choice since he’s been with the team this year and driven the car.

Of the three drivers which I believe have no more than an outside shot, the most likely would be Kamui Kobayashi. I don’t think it’s a big chance, but Charles Pic doesn’t have all that much money I don’t think and Adrian Sutil has anger management issues, though maybe the team is happy now that he’s cooled his heels for a season. This is by far the hardest prediction to make for 2013 in my opinion due to all the moving parts. It’s also probably the hardest decision to make for the executives at Force India.

Marussia, Caterham and HRT

I’ve grouped all three of these teams into one segment because I think they will be making their decisions all by asking the same question: “Who can bring the most money to the team?” Yes, it’s true that some of these teams have loyalties to their testers and other ties to drivers but these teams are so short on cash that most of the time they do not have the luxury of taking a better driver with less to offer in sponsorship.

Marussia would be smart to keep Charles Pic around. He’s done a good job and the odds are he won’t be going to any other team next year. They’re also still under contract with Timo Glock, but I’m not entirely convinced that it is a sure thing. Other strong possibilities would include Max Chilton and Luiz Razia.

Showing promise at Caterham
Showing promise at CaterhamCredit: Caterham F1

Caterham was rather disappointing this year. They looked so good at the end of 2011 and promised to be fighting with the mid-field this year but apart from a brilliant drive by Heikki Kovalainen at Monaco and a few other star moments this season, the team has rather fallen flat. Rumor has it that Vitaly Petrov is out of money and can’t afford his seat next year, and I sort of get the feeling that Heikki is in the same boat. Luckily they have a stable of drivers who have tested for them and look promising. Luiz Razia tested this year, Giedo van der Garde, Rodolfo González and Alexander Rossi are the team’s official development drivers so Caterham are spoiled for choice. It’s just a matter of who has the most cash on hand.

HRT is still under contract with Pedro de la Rosa for 2013 but that is much the same situation as Timo Glock. Who knows if he’s sticking around? Narain Karthikeyan is not under contract and hasn’t done much for the team this year. At least Pedro can offer some kind of experienced tutoring and advice, even if he can’t drive the car into the points. Dani Clos and Tonio Liuzzi are the team’s development drivers but they have as good a shot as any in my opinion.

Final Predictions

This is the section I promised never to write. I don’t want to be held to it and it’s just simply too hard to predict; however, I’ve been brow-beaten and peer-pressured to do it, so here are my predictions for next year. Each driver also has a number on a scale of 0-10 indicating how confident I am of my prediction. This was the concession my friends made, since I was so concerned about my reputation. Now, at least, I can say ‘hey, I said I wasn’t totally sure’. Okay… here goes:

2013 Driver Lineup Predictions
TeamDriverDriver
Red BullSebastian VettelMark Webber
FerrariFernando AlonsoFelipe Massa
McLarenJenson ButtonSergio Pérez
LotusKimi RäikkönenRomain Grosjean (8)
MercedesLewis HamiltonNico Rosberg
SauberNico HülkenbergEsteban Gutiérrez (7)
Force IndiaPaul di RestaJaime Alguersuari (5)
WilliamsPastor Maldonado (8)Valtteri Bottas (7)
Toro RossoJean-Éric VergneDaniel Ricciardo
MarussiaTimo Glock (6)Charles Pic (5)
CaterhamBruno Senna (3)Giedo van der Garde (5)
HRTPedro de la Rosa (4)Kamui Kobayashi (7)



  • According to a reliable paddock source who pops up online now and again, the Williams team is actually quite happy with Bruno; he's considered extraordinarily technically proficient (and they're not the first team to say so), and more consistent than Bottas (and Maldonado, for that matter, but anyone with eyes can see that at this point in the year) across long runs. Toto Wolff is the real issue. He has at least a 10% vested interest in Bottas' career, and he's already gotten his wife in the team door. (I'm a female fan, and would absolutely love to see more women racers, but Susie Wolff's record is just not nearly impressive enough to appear where she has at this stage in the race.) As has tended to be the case with Senna's career in F1, the team loves him, but his boss has other ideas.

  • I would agree with most of the predictions. I think though that Jules Bianchi will get the Force India seat because it has been the pattern there recently to promote the test driver. Of course Vijay's business problems may dictate something different.

    I can' see Caterham getting rid of Kovalainen and I don't see him walking away without another F1 contract. Unfortunately for Heikki the team have come nowhere close to delivering what they promised. He should be moving up the grid by now but there is nowhere obvious he can go. He would be the ideal driver for Sauber, Force India, Notus etc.

    The Williams situation is difficult to read. Over the years we have all built up a clear picture of what Frank and Patrick like in a driver but with the power swinging to Toto Wolfe who knows what may happen. Maldonado should still have plenty of sponsoship money since the President of Venezuela was re-elected a few weeks ago. That makes me think his position is close to bullet-proof. The other seat is a lot more difficult to forecast. If pushed I would probably say that I think Bottas will get it.

    I think Bruno Senna is a decent F1 driver and worthy of a drive for a few more seasons. It is such a shame that we will never know how good he could have been had he not stopped racing for ten years.

  • Take all Friday third driver times with a grain of salt. The agenda under those circumstances has nothing at all to do with improving the performance of that particular car for the weekend. And the driver who loses that session seldom recovers to achieve an ideal set-up for either qualifying or the race.

    Said another way, third drivers, car troubles, and "car troubles" (the euphemistic kind) conspire to make the regular driver look bad.

  • Agreed, Jim. This is why it only makes me laugh to see the commentators falling for it every weekend, praising Bottas to high heaven on so little evidence when, as far as anyone apart from the Williams team knows, he and Maldonado could be running vastly differing setups, fuel loads, balances, and programs in the two cars. FP1 times are about the most meaningless of the entire weekend, especially when one session is occupied by a reserve driver. They're doing it to build up hype around Bottas, and it's working.

    (This is why it strikes me as them rather shooting themselves in the foot and totally nonsensical, considering that qualifying is where Bruno needs to improve, they're taking precious setup and practice time away and wrong-footing him there, and yet he's the more consistent driver who could deliver even more points than he already has if he started higher up the grid. Without his consistency, the team would probably be lumbering behind Toro Rosso in the championship. I know why they do this - it's down to PDVSA's contract stipulations with the team, that "a Venezuelan driver" must be in the car for "all practice sessions" - but in a logical world, the more experienced driver would make way while the new one who has the steeper learning curve would get more of the needed practice time. Or, like every other team on the grid, who do it fairly, they'd split the losses evenly between the two. It's just a sad business to watch unfold.)

  • Glad to have started some multi-paragraph comments...

  • ...makes me laugh to see the commentators falling for it...

    I get a good laugh, too. They take the bait, most fans take the bait. It must be tasty bait. (I prefer to believe that the media professionals are outright lying, and not just outright gullible. Too depressing, otherwise.)

    in a logical world, the more experienced driver would make way while the new one who has the steeper learning curve would get more of the needed practice time.

    Logical only if the most important factor is the track time to experience ratio. I'm inclined to think that if a session is to be lost, it is the weaker driver who should lose it (why compromise one's best?). Regardless, Bruno Senna knows the score, as does the Williams team.

    They know they aren't doing him any favours when they put someone else in his car for FP1. I guess I would like to hear the team state that themselves. Maybe that's expecting too much. Which is where the media pros are falling down on the job, as we've both said.

    Bruno is shrewd and knows what he brings to the table. At Williams, the leverage isn't his. "Leverage", like "car troubles", is mostly related to money. Bruno knows a thing or two about the sponsor-hunting game. He will have lots of opportunities to race, even if Williams shows him the door.

    It's just a sad business to watch unfold.

    It truly is.

  • I get a good laugh, too. They take the bait, most fans take the bait. It must be tasty bait. (I prefer to believe that the media professionals are outright lying, and not just outright gullible. Too depressing, otherwise.)

    When the bottom few teams were allowed to run a third driver so many paid 'experts' spent an awful lot of time saying that Ant Davidson was faster than the race drivers and based on those times should have a race seat. It didn't seem to occur to them that he only had to make his engine last about 50 laps while the race drivers had to make theirs last a lot longer. He could trash his tyres while they may need them later in the weekend. He could have a full quali set up on the car while the race drivers had to work on a race set up.

    Logical only if the most important factor is the track time to experience ratio. I'm inclined to think that if a session is to be lost, it is the weaker driver who should lose it (why compromise one's best?). Regardless, Bruno Senna knows the score, as does the Williams team.

    Agreed. It makes no sense for a team to compromise its stronger driver's performance.

    Bruno is shrewd and knows what he brings to the table. At Williams, the leverage isn't his. "Leverage", like "car troubles", is mostly related to money. Bruno knows a thing or two about the sponsor-hunting game. He will have lots of opportunities to race, even if Williams shows him the door.

    If your name is Senna you should be able to raise more sponsorship than anyone else. Bruno's name should be a huge advantage to him but depite being intelligent he doesn't seem to be able to use it the way you would expect.

  • Toto Wolff is the real issue. He has at least a 10% vested interest in Bottas' career...

    Just 10%. It's far, far, far more than that.

    ;)

  • They're doing it to build up hype around Bottas, and it's working.

    Big danger for Bottas is that when Melbourne comes around next year, he'll have been 17 months without a race of any kind.

    That's not healthy and all the FP1's in the world will never fix a lack of race fitness.

  • Big danger for Bottas is that when Melbourne comes around next year, he'll have been 17 months without a race of any kind.

    That almost sounds like Williams are lining themselves up for 2x the amount of #BlamePastor that they have now.

  • 1) Howdy, Steven! Here's a few thoughts on your last point.

    If your name is Senna you should be able to raise more sponsorship than anyone else. Bruno's name should be a huge advantage to him but depite being intelligent he doesn't seem to be able to use it the way you would expect.

    The name alone is not/was never enough. It is the greatest last name in recent F1 history (I hear Schumacher fans howling!), but it isn't being carried at the front of the grid or onto the podium. That makes it interesting, but not necessarily a good investment.

    A few good comparisons are out there. Damon Hill pre-qualifying the Brabham in 1992 did not evoke any positive associations with his championship winning father (nor his own championship winning future self). Success, reward, and respect came later.

    Dale Earnhardt Sr. gave us one son of immense fame and fortune racing in NASCAR. And two other sons whose racing careers are, more or less, trivia questions-in-wating. Dale Jr. can trade on his name because he backs it up on the track. His siblings... not so much (though his sister has always been touted as a great "might have been" had she chosen a career in driving).

    Also consider the two Jacques Villeneuves, one the brother and the other the son of Gilles. The younger Jacques was given great opportunities and took full advantage them. The elder Jacques - not an unskilled racer - was not afforded the same (and did not really pursue them, either). I think the patrilineal association trumps the others. (There is a trivia goldmine out there in the uncle/nephew category: the two Jacques, J.M. Fangio II, Christian Fittipaldi, Casey Mears, a few Unsers, John Andretti, and Bruno.)

    When the headlines once again scream "SENNA WINS!", dude'll write his own ticket anywhere. Bruno has to remind us of more than his uncle's name. Then the headlines will shout "BRUNO WINS!" because we'll already know his last name.

    2) And you are spot on with these comments:

    When the bottom few teams were allowed to run a third driver so many paid 'experts' spent an awful lot of time saying that Ant Davidson was faster than the race drivers and based on those times should have a race seat. It didn't seem to occur to them that he only had to make his engine last about 50 laps while the race drivers had to make theirs last a lot longer. He could trash his tyres while they may need them later in the weekend. He could have a full quali set up on the car while the race drivers had to work on a race set up.

    A classic example of apples to apples vs. apples to oranges. Why won't they tell it like it is? Do they think they'll confuse us?

  • Kobayashi at HRT? If Sauber can't afford to keep him on, HRT certainly can't.

    Maldonado is a shoe in at Williams. Makes me wonder if he's looking to go elsewhere - vacant seats at Sauber and Lotus...?

  • Kobayashi at HRT? If Sauber can't afford to keep him on, HRT certainly can't.

    I don't think I'm as confident as a 7 on this one... I'm really closer to a 2 on that. I don't think Kobayashi is going to be getting paid after this year, is my point.

  • I don't think I'm as confident as a 7 on this one... I'm really closer to a 2 on that. I don't think Kobayashi is going to be getting paid after this year, is my point.

    will there even be a HRT team to go to?

    en.espnf1.com/hrt…/story/94651.html

  • The name alone is not/was never enough. It is the greatest last name in recent F1 history (I hear Schumacher fans howling!), but it isn't being carried at the front of the grid or onto the podium. That makes it interesting, but not necessarily a good investment.

    Normally I would agree that a name on its own has never been enough but Senna is no ordinary name. Given how Ayrton was viewed in Brazil and his well known comment to Joe Ramirez "If you think I am quick wait until you see my nephew" you would have thought he would have been able to raise $10-20 million a year without too much difficulty.

    Also consider the two Jacques Villeneuves, one the brother and the other the son of Gilles. The younger Jacques was given great opportunities and took full advantage them. The elder Jacques - not an unskilled racer - was not afforded the same (and did not really pursue them, either).

    There are people who really know there stuff who claim Uncle Jacques was better than Gilles. That thought has always boggled my mind. Jacques never got a decent break in F1 so it is hard to judge what he would have done. Of course there are all sorts of other potentially top drivers who never got a sensible crack at F1 like Mike Thackwell, Tommy Byrne and Allan McNish so not getting a crack at F1 is no indication of a lack of driver performance. His CART record was nothing special either. He won several snowmobile championships and two Formula Atlantic championships. Those titles were in 1980 and 1981. The following year Gilles died and Jacques never came close to winning another championship in anything again. If Gilles had survived who knows what Jacques may have done. That thought reminds me of Damon Hill's comment when he was in the early days of his car racing career. He said that he would have had a much easier time had his father been there to shake a few hands.

  • Normally I would agree that a name on its own has never been enough but Senna is no ordinary name. Given how Ayrton was viewed in Brazil and his well known comment to Joe Ramirez "If you think I am quick wait until you see my nephew" you would have thought he would have been able to raise $10-20 million a year without too much difficulty.

    Steven, the quote is more famous than Bruno is... (and Bruno was only a child at the time). Affection alone can only carry one so far.

    There are people who really know there stuff who claim Uncle Jacques was better than Gilles.That thought has always boggled my mind. Jacques never got a decent break in F1 so it is hard to judge what he would have done. Of course there are all sorts of other potentially top drivers who never got a sensible crack at F1 like Mike Thackwell, Tommy Byrne and Allan McNish so not getting a crack at F1 is no indication of a lack of driver performance. His CART record was nothing special either. He won several snowmobile championships and two Formula Atlantic championships. Those titles were in 1980 and 1981. The following year Gilles died and Jacques never came close to winning another championship in anything again. If Gilles had survived who knows what Jacques may have done. That thought reminds me of Damon Hill's comment when he was in the early days of his car racing career. He said that he would have had a much easier time had his father been there to shake a few hands.

    I want to applaud your love for all things Villeneuve. Snowmobile racing on Sidepodcast! Shout-out to Eagle River, Wisconsin!

    Uncle Jacques promised his and Gilles' mom that what happened to Gilles wouldn't happen to him, too (at least not while mom was alive). So, he didn't pursue any kind of global fame after Gilles died. When I said "not an unskilled racer", I was seriously understating how highly I regard him (but I'm just a plebe). He could make bad cars go fast, like Gilles. Sure, his statistics in CART weren't great. But that doesn't mean he wasn't awesome. His peers from CART would back that statement up, I think.

    The "better than Gilles" talk is emotion more than fact. It is impossible to judge, as you said. I'm not convinced he could have outraced Gilles in the same car. I am certain that he would have been impressive. And I didn't mean to imply that having a career in F1 defines a driver's greatness. It's a shame when talent behind the wheel is perceived so narrowly. The car doesn't make the driver. Or, at least, it shouldn't.

  • Steven, the quote is more famous than Bruno is... (and Bruno was only a child at the time). Affection alone can only carry one so far.

    Bruno unfortunately will never be able to reach his potential. One of Ayrton's toys was a limited edition Ducati motorbike that was way quicker than the standard model. It was so quick that Ayrton banned anyone else frm riding it. Shortly after Ayrton's death Bruno's father decided he could ride the bike and killed himself. Ayrton's father who had been organising Bruno's karting career decided that it was not a good idea to risk the life of another member of the family. As a result Bruno didn't race for ten years. He lost out on an incredible amount of valuable experience. It can't be easy to take on the best drivers in the world when even the youngsters have ten year's more experience.

    Imagine how good he would have been had he not had such a long break and he had Ayrton to advise him along the way.

  • I can't imagine a Heikki-less grid, he's not a pay driver?

  • I can't imagine a Heikki-less grid, he's not a pay driver?

    i wonder how the team dynamic will change with tony out of the picture and cyril in? heikki was bff's with tony, but if he's not around, is there less commitment to stay. it's a shame he went to mclaren when he did. right now he would be the perfect partner to button.

  • #BOTTAS

  • :)

  • I have a feeling Kobayashi leaving Sauber might be seen as a step down if he does go to HRT at this point. It would be a shame if he doesn't have a F1 seat for 2013 al all even if he can get more sponsors on board from Japan for his part.

  • Imagine how good he would have been had he not had such a long break and he had Ayrton to advise him along the way.

    I didn't know all the details of that story. It looks like Bruno has had to compress his learning curve. I think that he's acquitting himself very well, all things considered.

    I'm not in the camp that says that one has to start racing at the age of two for the purpose of developing "skills" (but that's another story, literally). What he has lost, for sure, is similar to the Damon Hill early days. I guess one could say that the Senna name, if not paying off in raw dollars, has at least opened doors that otherwise wouldn't have opened for someone else of similar experience.

  • I didn't know all the details of that story. It looks like Bruno has had to compress his learning curve. I think that he's acquitting himself very well, all things considered.

    When he went back to karting he broke ribs on a few occasions bashing over kerbs. All kart drivers bash over kerbs but their bodies have years to adjust to it. He had to be really committed to put up with the constant pain and injury.

    I'm not in the camp that says that one has to start racing at the age of two for the purpose of developing "skills" (but that's another story, literally). What he has lost, for sure, is similar to the Damon Hill early days. I guess one could say that the Senna name, if not paying off in raw dollars, has at least opened doors that otherwise wouldn't have opened for someone else of similar experience.

    Damon started motorbike racing at a younger age than Bruno went back to karting so he had more racing but a lot less on 4 wheels.

  • When he went back to karting he broke ribs on a few occasions bashing over kerbs. All kart drivers bash over kerbs but their bodies have years to adjust to it. He had to be really committed to put up with the constant pain and injury.

    That's sad. (A little disgusting, even). I had no idea that the loads were there for regular bone-breaking. Those aren't even accidents. Just the regular operation of the kart. He was obviously committed to the sport.

    Damon started motorbike racing at a younger age than Bruno went back to karting so he had more racing but a lot less on 4 wheels.

    Damon's the example I point to for starting the 4-wheeled career late (or later than typical). There are lots of other examples throughout the various forms of motorsports, but he is the highest profile one.

  • i wonder how the team dynamic will change with tony out of the picture and cyril in? heikki was bff's with tony, but if he's not around, is there less commitment to stay. it's a shame he went to mclaren when he did. right now he would be the perfect partner to button.

    he's bffs with riad too, who knows? you're right about the mclaren thing. shame he sucked so bad there haha.

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